I run my own network drive such that all computers in my network can access the same files. Every time when I try to access the shared files from Windows 7, it comes with nightmare (a gift from Microsoft). For example, if I move files within the network drive, Windows 7 will display a very annoying box like the one showing on the right.

These files might be harmful to your computer.

Your internet security settings suggest that one of more files may be harmful. Do you want to use it anyway?

If you click the help link below the message, you will find nothing but junk.

So how to get rid of this annoying box? You know, and we all know that Microsoft product is buggy and with lots of security problem. This box does nothing more than telling you:

Hey we are buggy. If your network drives contain virus or worm, that’s your problem, nothing to do with us. Do it at your own risk.

(And don’t forget that other operating system such as OS X, Linux etc do not have any annoying box, nor they do have any virus.)

To get kill this annoying box, simply following these steps:

1. Go to Internet Options (Control Panel -> Network and Internet -> Internet Options)

2. Open the Security tab and select Local Intranet

3. Click Local Intranet

4. Type the IP address of your network drive

That’s it!

Happy file sharing.

–Derrick

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Ubuntu was out today, and I could not wait to try out the new features. However I am in the office now and I have no physical access to my Ubuntu box in my kitchen, so using the graphic interface is not an option to me. I searched online and I couldn’t find any tutorial about upgrading the Ubuntu via command line. So I decided to try my own:

First, make sure that your Ubuntu box is up-to-date:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade -y
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade -y

Then, do some preparation work:

sudo apt-get install update-manager-core

Make sure that:

sudo nano /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades
Prompt=normal

Next, we are ready to start the journey:

sudo do-release-upgrade -d

Notice that Ubuntu will complain if you do it via SSH. I don’t care, so I choose “YES”.

Later, it will ask you whether you want to remove the old packages and install the new one. Of course the answer is Yes.

Depending on your CPU and internet connection speed. It can range from 30 minutes to few hours. After everything is done, make sure that you upgrade the system again:

sudo apt-get update -y
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade -y

That’s it! Have fun with Ubuntu 11.10!

–Derrick

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This tutorial is for FreeBSD. If you are looking for setting up Pure-FTPd on Linux, click here.

My client likes to send me a huge data file (More than 10GB after compressed). Since I don’t care about the security during the transfer, I decide to go with the old school technology: FTP.

Basically, I need to set up a FTP server with virtual user. In the other words, the log in used by the FTP server has nothing to do with my system login, and I can easily disable that at any time.

1.) Install Pure-FTPd

sudo pkg_add -r pure-ftpd

2.) Create a user for Pure-FTPd, here I simply call it ftpuser.

sudo adduser ftpuser

3.) Let say, we want to create a user called guest to access the ftp server. guest is a virtual user, and its virtual home is in /home/ftpuser/guest

sudo mkdir /home/ftpuser/guest
sudo chown -R ftpuser:ftpuser  /home/ftpuser/
sudo chmod a+rw -R /home/ftpuser/

4.) Edit /etc/inetd.conf and add the following:

ftp     stream  tcp     nowait  root    /usr/local/sbin/pure-ftpd -O stats:/var/log/pureftpd.log       pure-ftpd -l puredb:/usr/local/etc/pureftpd.pdb

5.) Restart inetd

ps -ax | grep inetd
sudo killall -HUP inetd
sudo /usr/sbin/inetd -wW -C 6

6.) Edit /etc/syslog.conf

sudo nano /etc/syslog.conf

7.) Restart syslog

ps -ax | grep syslog
killall -HUP syslogd
/usr/sbin/syslogd -ss

8.) Create a user and add it into the Pure-FTPd database:

sudo pure-pw useradd guest -u ftpuser -d /home/ftpuser/guest/

You can also set the quota and maximum space:
1000 files, 100MB quota

pure-pw useradd guest -u ftpuser -d /home/ftpuser/guest/ -n 1000 -N 100 

9.) Set the password in case you forget the enter the password:

pure-pw passwd guest

10.) Update the database:

pure-pw mkdb

11.) If the system could not update the database, try this instead (One command, not two):

sudo pure-pw mkdb /usr/local/etc/pureftpd.pdb -f /usr/local/etc/pureftpd.passwd

That’s it!

–Derrick

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This tutorial is for Fedora Linux. If you are looking for setting up Pure-FTPd on FreeBSD, click here.

My client likes to send me a huge data file (More than 10GB after compressed). Since I don’t care about the security during the transfer, I decide to go with the old school technology: FTP.

Basically, I need to set up a FTP server with virtual user. In the other words, the log in used by the FTP server has nothing to do with my system login, and I can easily disable that at any time.

0.) Make sure port 21 is opened. You can update this setting in the Fedora Firewall settings.

1.) Install Pure-FTPd

sudo yum install pure-ftpd -y

2.) Create a user for Pure-FTPd, here I simply call it ftpuser.

sudo adduser ftpuser

3.) Let say, we want to create a user called guest to access the ftp server. guest is a virtual user, and its virtual home is in /home/ftpuser/guest

sudo mkdir /home/ftpuser/guest
sudo chown -R ftpuser:ftpuser  /home/ftpuser/
sudo chmod a+rw -R /home/ftpuser/

4.) Edit the Pure-FTPd configuration

sudo nano /etc/pure-ftpd/pure-ftpd.conf

5.) Uncomment the following:

PureDB                        /etc/pure-ftpd/pureftpd.pdb

6.) Start the Pure-FTPd

/etc/init.d/pure-ftpd start

If you want to start Pure-FTPd automatically, include this line in /etc/rc.local

7.) Create a user and add it into the Pure-FTPd database:

sudo pure-pw useradd guest -u ftpuser -d /home/ftpuser/guest/

You can also set the quota and maximum space:
1000 files, 100MB quota

pure-pw useradd guest -u ftpuser -d /home/ftpuser/guest/ -n 1000 -N 100 

8.) Set the password in case you forget the enter the password:

pure-pw passwd guest

9.) Update the database:

pure-pw mkdb

That’s it!

–Derrick

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